Antinous as Aristaeus

Antinous as Aristaeus Roman, 2nd century C.E. Collection of the Musee du Louvre, Paris. Photo of statue by Marie-Lan Nguyen via Wikimedia Commons (X). Image license: Public Domain. Background: Honeycomb via peakpix.com (X) Background image license: Creative Commons Zero – CC0      🐝    🐝    🐝    🐝    🐝    🐝    🐝   …

“Christianizing the Planetary Week and Globalizing the Seven-Day Cycle”

Anderson, Mark. “Christianizing the Planetary Week and Globalizing the Seven-Day Cycle.” Studies in Late Antiquity, Vol. 3 No. 2, Summer 2019; (pp. 128-191)  DOI: 10.1525/sla.2019.3.2.128  https://sla.ucpress.edu/content/3/2/128#sec-9 Interesting article for a number of reasons, not least the table of planetary weekday activities and the translations included in the appendices. Featured image:  7 Days of the week bracelet Seven Olympian gods depicted…

Free Online Courses Starting Today!

Greek and Roman Mythology Offered by the University of Pennsylvania, 10 weeks: https://www.coursera.org/learn/mythology   Roman Art and Archaeology  Offered by the University of Arizona , 6 weeks:  https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-art-archaeology   Ancient Philosophy: Plato & His Predecessors Offered by the University of Pennsylvania, 4 weeks:  https://www.coursera.org/learn/plato   Arch of Titus: Rome and the Menorah Offered by Yeshiva University, 6 weeks:   …

Health, Life, Joy, Peace, Good Cheer, Hope.

Featured image: Stone mosaic; square black border containing a laurel wreath. Greek inscription reads: “Health, Life, Joy, Peace, Good Cheer, Hope.” Roman, 4th century CE. Excavated by: Sir Charles Thomas Newton at Hadji Captan’s Field (Halicarnassus) in 1857. Image: © The Trustees of the British Museum (X). Image license: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)…

Totally “just friends”

“Here reposes Aquinas, reunited to his faithful Fabricius, who rejoices in having preceded him to the Elysian retreats. This double altar bears record that each was honoured with the rank of chief centurion; but that praise is of still greater worth which you read in this shorter inscription: Both were united in the sacred bond…

Go ahead, make it worse

Hey, fam! Hope you’re doing as well as can be expected just now. I’m fine, as is my partner. Just having internet issues. After dealing with multiple crashes on Monday and Tuesday, I finally broke down and make a lengthy call to my ISP on Wednesday. A technician spent about 45 minutes performing trouble-shooting, and…

“What I think I do”

Featured Images: An offering of incense at an altar during a religious ritual, Roman, 2nd century. Collection of the Roman-Germanic Museum, Cologne. Attic Red-Figure Cup Fragment by the Akestorides Painter (circa 470 – 450 BCE). Collection f the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles (X). Digital image courtesy of the Getty’s Opeon Content Program.  

Near and Far: On the Dilemmas of Social Distancing

via Near and Far: On the Dilemmas of Social Distancing Georg Simmel, a German sociologist, adopted the idea of “distance” to describe one aspect of social interaction, that is, the discrepancy between “spatial” and “social” distance. In Simmelian terms, the stranger is a formal structuring of personality. “The stranger has elements of nearness and remoteness – he…

Prayer to Apollo in Time of Plague

Originally posted on Underflow:
Fair Apollo, son of thundering Zeus who holds in his hands the order of the world, golden god who parcels health and illness to all as is fit, who holds the door against disease or lets it in, all at your will. Apollo, we thank you for health, we thank you…

Virtual tours and museum exhibits!

The Digital Hadrian’s Villa Project Virtual Roman Pantheon in Blue Mars The Swedish Pompeii Project: Virtual tour of tour of the House of Caecilius Iucundus From the Vatican Museums: Pio Clementino Museum Chiaramonti Museum From the Getty Museums: Assyria: Palace Art of Ancient Iraq The Legacy of Ancient Palmyra Beyond the Nile From the Kelsey Museum…

Oedipus and the sphinx

Featured image: Force and Reason by John Duncan, 1939. Collection of the Glasgow Museums Resource Centre via artuk.org (X) Image license:  Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (CC BY-NC-ND).