The British Museum Says It Will Never Return the Elgin Marbles, Defending Their Removal as a ‘Creative Act’

https://news.artnet.com/art-world/british-museum-wont-return-elgin-marbles-1449919 British Museum director Hartwig Fischer is facing international backlash after defending an English nobleman’s removal of sculptures from the Parthenon in the early 1800s as a “creative act,” and reiterated that the museum’s trustees would not support repatriating them to Athens. In a recent interview with the Greek daily newspaper Ta Nea, Fischer said…

Sarah Bond: A Roundup of Reports, Reactions, and Reflections After the SCS Annual Meeting

https://classicalstudies.org/scs-blog/sarah-bond/blog-roundup-reports-reactions-and-reflections-after-scs-annual-meeting By Sarah Bond | Jan 18, 2019 It has now been nearly two weeks since the SCS-AIA annual meeting in San Diego, and many have written evocative, emotional, and important pieces about the racist events that occurred there. Instead of posting each separately on our social media or blog, I have tried to compile as many…

If ‘In God We Trust’ Isn’t Really A Religious Statement, Then What Exactly Is It?

https://www.au.org/blogs/wall-of-separation/if-in-god-we-trust-isnt-really-a-religious-statement-then-what-exactly-is?utm_source=blogdigest&utm_medium=email Thanks in part to Project Blitz, we’re seeing a number of bills in several states requiring public schools to post “In God We Trust” in classrooms, school libraries and other areas. While many lawmakers who push these bills are only too happy to brag about how they’re getting God back into public schools, others, perhaps…

Ancient Roman Gems in the Treasure of St Denis

Aquamarine intaglio from the Screen of Charlemagne Collection of the  Bibliothèque Nationale de France. Photograph by Clio20, via Wikimedia Commons (X). Image license:  GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 This intaglio portrait of Julia Flavia has a curious history. It was carved by the Greek engraver Evodos, probably in the 1st Century C.E.; the gold setting may date…

Material evidence of religious violence

I’ve been talking to people recently about what the material evidence of a major change in society looks like. Today, I will briefly discuss the example of the material evidence of the change in religion that occurred in Late Antiquity, when Christianity became the dominant religion in the Roman Empire. This change was brought about…

In memory of Khaled al-Asaad

Today, 1 January, marks the birth of Khaled al-Asaad near the temple of Bel in Palmyra, Syria in 1932. He became interested in archaeology from a very young age, and studied history at the University of Damascus. He joined the Directorate General of Antiquities and Museums in Damascus, and served as Director of Antiquities of…

Roman deities honored on January 1

Featured Image: Roman coins. All photos © The Trustees of the British Museum. Image License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) Clockwise, from top left: Janus crowned with laurel wreath Obverse side of copper alloy coin. Roman Republican, 90 BCE. Minted in Rome. (X) Asclepius with serpent-wreathed staff Reverse side of silver coin of Hadrian, 117-138. Minted…