Related reading 2019

I managed to finish 41 books this year! Only 15 were non-fiction, but I think I did good! Here are the 8 books I read with relevance to this blog, with brief summaries: Christianizing the Roman Empire by Ramsay McMullen Discusses the ‘how’ of the issue, and doesn’t sidestep coercion and violence. Religion in Roman Egypt…

The Monster Compilation of Free Online Resources for Classical Studies – Update

Featured image: Muse reading a volumen (scroll), at the left an open chest. Attic red-figure lekythos, circs. 435-425 BCE. From Boeotia. Collection of the Louvre Museum, Paris. Photo by Jastrow (2006) via WIkimedia Commons (here)  25 July 2019 Update Classical studies is the interdisciplinary study of the ancient Mediterranean world, including archaeology, language, literature, culture, history,…

A Snack for Cerberus

Featured Image: Psyche enters the underworld giving an offering to Cerberus Engraving by The Master of the Die, circa ca. 1530–60. Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York via Wikimedia Commons (X). Public Domain. When someone was buried in ancient Greece, they were not only provided with a coin to pay Charon the ferryman for…

Word of the Day: Apotheosis

Definition 1 a : the perfect form or example of something : quintessence b : the highest or best part of something : peak 2 : elevation to divine status : deification Did You Know? Among the ancient Greeks, it was sometimes thought fitting—or simply handy, say if you wanted a god somewhere in your bloodline—to grant someone…

Material evidence of religious violence

I’ve been talking to people recently about what the material evidence of a major change in society looks like. Today, I will briefly discuss the example of the material evidence of the change in religion that occurred in Late Antiquity, when Christianity became the dominant religion in the Roman Empire. This change was brought about…

Pillars of Hellenismos

  Featured Image: Row of columns in Ancient Messene, Greece. Photo by: Peulle, 2017 via WIkimedia Commons (X). License: Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0) The “Pillars of Hellenismos” never really existed. And by that, I mean the ancient Greeks weren’t taught something called the  “Pillars” of their religion. Their religion had no name, and religious practices were…