A prayer for this time

The Orphic Hymn to Dike Incense: frankincense I celebrate in song the all-seeing eye of splendid Dike, who also seats herself on the holy throne of Lord Zeus, and looks down from the heavens on the lives of the many different kinds of mortals, an avenging, heavy judgement against the unjust. Out of equality, she…

“Christianizing the Planetary Week and Globalizing the Seven-Day Cycle”

Anderson, Mark. “Christianizing the Planetary Week and Globalizing the Seven-Day Cycle.” Studies in Late Antiquity, Vol. 3 No. 2, Summer 2019; (pp. 128-191)  DOI: 10.1525/sla.2019.3.2.128  https://sla.ucpress.edu/content/3/2/128#sec-9 Interesting article for a number of reasons, not least the table of planetary weekday activities and the translations included in the appendices. Featured image:  7 Days of the week bracelet Seven Olympian gods depicted…

Virtual tours and museum exhibits!

The Digital Hadrian’s Villa Project Virtual Roman Pantheon in Blue Mars The Swedish Pompeii Project: Virtual tour of tour of the House of Caecilius Iucundus From the Vatican Museums: Pio Clementino Museum Chiaramonti Museum From the Getty Museums: Assyria: Palace Art of Ancient Iraq The Legacy of Ancient Palmyra Beyond the Nile From the Kelsey Museum…

Anon Ask: Did any pagan apologetics survive?

anonymous asked: This is something that has been on my mind for a bit. Do we have any records from Pagans in Rome following the rise of Christianity? What I would be most interested in would be apologetics and the like, but I can imagine the Christians would have destroyed these, but did any records, opinions,…

Asclepia

Asclepios, Lord Paian, healer of all, you charm away the pains of those who suffer. Come, mighty and soothing, bring health, put an end to sickness, then to the harsh fate of death. O blessed spirit of joyful growth, O helper, you ward off evil, honored and mighty son of Phoibos Apollon. Enemy of disease,…

Related reading 2019

I managed to finish 41 books this year! Only 15 were non-fiction, but I think I did good! Here are the 8 books I read with relevance to this blog, with brief summaries: Christianizing the Roman Empire by Ramsay McMullen Discusses the ‘how’ of the issue, and doesn’t sidestep coercion and violence. Religion in Roman Egypt…

The Monster Compilation of Free Online Resources for Classical Studies – Update

Featured image: Muse reading a volumen (scroll), at the left an open chest. Attic red-figure lekythos, circs. 435-425 BCE. From Boeotia. Collection of the Louvre Museum, Paris. Photo by Jastrow (2006) via WIkimedia Commons (here)  25 July 2019 Update Classical studies is the interdisciplinary study of the ancient Mediterranean world, including archaeology, language, literature, culture, history,…

A Snack for Cerberus

Featured Image: Psyche enters the underworld giving an offering to Cerberus Engraving by The Master of the Die, circa ca. 1530–60. Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York via Wikimedia Commons (X). Public Domain. When someone was buried in ancient Greece, they were not only provided with a coin to pay Charon the ferryman for…

Word of the Day: Apotheosis

Definition 1 a : the perfect form or example of something : quintessence b : the highest or best part of something : peak 2 : elevation to divine status : deification Did You Know? Among the ancient Greeks, it was sometimes thought fitting—or simply handy, say if you wanted a god somewhere in your bloodline—to grant someone…

Material evidence of religious violence

I’ve been talking to people recently about what the material evidence of a major change in society looks like. Today, I will briefly discuss the example of the material evidence of the change in religion that occurred in Late Antiquity, when Christianity became the dominant religion in the Roman Empire. This change was brought about…

Pillars of Hellenismos

  Featured Image: Row of columns in Ancient Messene, Greece. Photo by: Peulle, 2017 via WIkimedia Commons (X). License: Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0) The “Pillars of Hellenismos” never really existed. And by that, I mean the ancient Greeks weren’t taught something called the  “Pillars” of their religion. Their religion had no name, and religious practices were…

Quote from Julian the Philosopher

“Are you not aware that all offerings whether great or small that are brought to the gods with piety have equal value, whereas without piety, I will not say hecatombs, but, by the gods, even the Olympian sacrifice of a thousand oxen is merely empty expenditure and nothing else?” —  From “To the Cynic Heracleios”…